Mo'Koko

Mo’Koko 50L

Mo’Koko 50L Premium Select is an eco-friendly coco substrate direct from Holland.

Excellent for cultivating ornamental plants, vegetables and potted plants. Comes ready-to-use.

Use Mo’Koko as a medium for container gardens, nursery pots and planters. Ideal for automated soilless gardening systems. Mo’Koko also functions as a conditioner when combined with soil, sand, peat moss or other grow mediums. Use at a 5:1 ratio. Suitable for use indoors or outdoors.

•Low EC value.
•Excellent air to water ratio.
•Completely recyclable and renewable.

Triple-washed and buffered to prevent calcium and magnesium lockout while stabilizing pH values. Free of any harmful pathogens thanks to a unique heat-treatment sterilization process.

Manufactured to the highest Dutch standards with shredded coconut husks, a highly renewable resource. Homogeneous quality. Mo’Koko is 100% ready to use with no additional preparation required.

Coconut coir, or coco coir, is one of the most popular growing mediums for everything from ferns to cucumbers. Coco coir delivers nutrients directly to your plants during every feeding cycle, and it also retains nutrients so you don’t have to water your plants as frequently as you would with a hydroponics system.

Growing Plants with Coconut Coir

Coconut coir comes from coconut palm husks, which make up the brown, fibrous part tucked between the white inner flesh we eat and the green outer shell of a coconut. Also called coco coir, this growing medium can either be used solo or mixed with another material, such as perlite it all depends on what you’re using it for.

Why Use Coconut Coir?

Coconut coir is often used as a substitute for peat moss in hydroponics systems and container gardening, and for good reason. For one thing, unlike peat moss, coconut coir is a renewable resource. It also has a more neutral pH, which makes managing the nutrients in hydroponics systems easier. Coconut coir also decomposes much more slowly than peat moss (think decades rather than months), meaning it releases fewer nutrients into the water that might throw the nutrient solution out of balance. That’s important because, in hydroponics, the makeup of the nutrient solution has a huge impact on growing success.